Fort St. John

Top 3 things to see or do in Fort St. John

Fort St. John boasts all the amenities of a larger centre and is surrounded by the natural beauty of the wild Peace region

The cash dest at The Peace Gallery North in Fort. St. John.
The Peace Gallery North in Fort St. John is a newly renovated venue that showcases the work of local artists. This cash desk was designed locally. — Photo courtesy Peace Gallery North

Marketed as the energetic city, Fort St. John, B.C., is a notable destination along the Alaska Highway. It boasts all the amenities of a larger centre and is surrounded by the natural beauty of the wild Peace region. These three suggested stops are conveniently accessible from 100th Street and offer a rounded glimpse into the history, culture and outdoors of the area.

Fort St. John North Peace Museum

Explore the rich history of the region at the Fort St. John North Peace Museum. With over 6,000 artifacts in its collection, this museum is a wonderful place to learn about the fur trade, the Alaska Highway, First Nations, the historical importance of oil and gas and more. The site also has a number of heritage buildings including a trapper’s cabin, general store, schoolhouse and dentist's office.

  • RV parking: A pull-through by the highway is a convenient space for RV parking.
  • Driving instructions:  Located at 9323 - 100th Street, Fort St. John, B.C. Exit north off the Alaska Highway on 100th Street. The museum is on the right, just past Canadian Tire.
  • Cost:  Adults $6 or seniors $5
  • Hours of operation: Monday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Website: http://www.fsjmuseum.com/

Peace Gallery North

To get a visual taste of the art and culture of the north, be sure to stop at the North Peace Cultural Centre. This unique red-and-silver building holds the Peace Gallery North. A rotating show features work by Peace Region artists,and there are also ongoing displays in a variety of mediums including photography and pottery. The gallery recently debuted a newly renovated space featuring industrial-inspired design. RVers can also stop at Fort St. John’s public library, which is also in the cultural centre, or check to see if there are art classes or events that pique their interest.

  • RV parking: Plenty of parking is available in the back of the building with access off of 99th Avenue.
  • Driving instructions: Located at 10015 - 100th Avenue, Fort St. John, B.C. Exit north off the Alaska Highway on 100th Street. The exhibit is in the North Peace Cultural Centre on the corner of 100th Street and 100th Avenue. 
  • Cost: Free
  • Hours of operation: Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Website: http://www.npcc.bc.ca/peace-gallery-north

Fish Creek Community Forest

The area around Fort St. John has no shortage of trails, parks or the great outdoors to explore. Visitors can take advantage of this strength at Fish Creek Community Forest, an accessible yet wildly beautiful spot where they can get their feet wet—metaphorically, of course. The area has three main trails. While some areas offer more difficult hiking, the Anatomy Trail is wheelchair accessible. However, it is important to remember that the area is not regularly maintained, so use caution while enjoying the paths.

  • RV parking:  Parking is provided behind the Northern Lights College in Fort St. John. There is a row of individual parking stalls.
  • Driving instructions: Head north off the Alaska Highway on 100th Street. Follow signage for Fish Creek Community Forest by turning right on E Bypass Road before the train tracks and then quickly left (over the train tracks) on 96th Street. The trailhead can be found by turning left towards the college and then immediately right past the student residence.
  • Cost:  Free
  • Hours of operation: Open year-round
  • Website: http://www.fortstjohn.ca/community-forest

 

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